This summer we’ve been witnessing amazing action on centre court at Wimbledon, and we’re gearing up for Rio!
Athletes need to train hard in preparation for the Olympics, but when it’s not done carefully – guess what? – they break.

Maybe it’s ‘get a beach body time’ (urghh), but we’ve witnessed a recent spike in injuries in patients who attend high intensity training classes, such as ‘Cross Fit’, ‘Barry’s Boot Camp’, ‘Body Attack’ and – are we really surprised? – ‘Insanity’.
It’s got me thinking that whilst we need to encourage active lifestyles, have we inadvertently invited folk to go a little too crazy?

Don’t get me wrong. I like to leap around in the great outdoors like any other Gore-Tex clad fool.

Nor am I getting up on my soapbox to have a pop at group exercise classes or their instructors – most do a fantastic job of trying improve the fitness and wellbeing of those who attend.

But is a form of exercise which describes itself as a ‘strength and conditioning program for police, military, and athletes’ really the most suitable form of activity for someone who has spent the best part of a decade degenerating in a boardroom chair?

Here’s a few MRI star pics –  the bodies of the brave and fearless, who have kindly agreed to share their over-enthusiastically acquired injuries with you. Ouch.

L4 5 and L5 S1 disc prolapses

L4 and L5 traumatic disc prolapse

Focal Osteochondral Femoral Condyle Injury

Focal Osteochondral Femoral Condyle Injury

Traumatic Pars Stress Fracture

Traumatic Pars Stress Fracture

acute calcific tendinopathy in shoulder

Acute Calcific Tendinopathy in the Shoulder

Massive Triceps and Teres Minor Muscle Oedema

Massive Triceps and Teres Minor Muscle Oedema

Whilst these images are striking, you may be asking yourself, ‘so they got unlucky – people get injured in sport everyday – what’s the big deal?’

The big deal is that all five of the injuries have something in common:
They all occurred in the patient’s very first (and also last) high intensity class.

So, at the risk of sounding like my mother, what’s wrong with some good old-fashioned ‘common sense’?

Let’s avoid getting Cross whilst trying to get Fit. Please.

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2017-06-01T10:56:52+00:00 By |Training tips|0 Comments

About the Author:

css@sportdoclondon.co.uk'
Dr Cath Spencer-Smith is a Consultant Physician in Sport and Exercise Medicine and Director of Sportdoc London. Cath is passionate about the diagnosis and management of all musculoskeletal conditions, and has expertise in getting to the bottom of persistent problems, such as hip and groin pain. She works with Olympians, through to the occasional exerciser.

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